About one in 10 doctors who vaccinate privately insured children are considering dropping that service largely because they are losing money when they do it, according to a new survey...

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/12/01/america/MED-Vaccines-Cost.php Question Who's Online | Find Members | Private Messages
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575 hits Rate me! Share Favorite | Flag 13 years ago by KikiPeepers

Should doctors be allowed to decide when and if they give vaccines to people?
About one in 10 doctors who vaccinate privately insured children are considering dropping that service largely because they are losing money when they do it, according to a new survey...

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008...


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13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 5:45:07 PM EST (GMT-5)
Yes. America's economy is a free market. If some doctors decide not to vaccinate than people will go to other doctors who do vaccinate.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 5:52:22 PM EST (GMT-5)
The way I read the article they aren't really deciding "when and if" they give vaccines. They are saying that they might stop administering vaccines since they are not able to recoup their costs for the vaccine...

Just as any other doctor chooses what services they provide, they should be free to decide if they want to give vaccines or not...

13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 5:59:10 PM EST (GMT-5)
You would think that rather than simply stop administering them, they would start charging more.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 7:02:32 PM EST (GMT-5)
This question kind of makes it seem like it's giving doctors the choice to choose who they vaccinate, which I am totally against, but am for the idea of letting doctors choose whether or not to vaccinate at all.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 7:19:07 PM EST (GMT-5)
Well, theyre doctors and their jobs are to take care of u so they should dcide when to give u vaccines
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 11:07:35 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Monday 12/1/08 - 5:59:10 PM catchall wrote:
You would think that rather than simply stop administering them, they would start charging more.


I don't think that will make a difference. The docs are charging enough, but the insurance companies only pay up to a certain amount- - not what the docs are asking for...

13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 11:21:49 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Monday 12/1/08 - 5:59:10 PM catchall wrote:
You would think that rather than simply stop administering them, they would start charging more.
On Monday 12/1/08 - 11:07:35 PM CowDung wrote:
I don't think that will make a difference. The docs are charging enough, but the insurance companies only pay up to a certain amount- - not what the docs are asking for...


Yeah, I'm not really sure where insurance companies get off deciding what these things are worth. I mean, sure they can decide how much to pay out. But why is the Dr. making up the difference? Shouldn't the remainder get passed on to the customer? And if the Dr. knows that the insurance won't pay the entire cost (and how could they not) why do they let people leave their office without paying? Most gas pumps are pay first, pump second. Why should the Dr. be any different?
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 11:24:54 PM EST (GMT-5)
Yes. A doctor working in a private practice should be allowed to provide medicine however he chooses.

If his patients don't like it, they can always go to a different provider.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 11:38:09 PM EST (GMT-5)
Catchall,

The insurance company has a 'co-pay' that the patient pays - usually 20% or so.

The insurance company says to the doctor, regardless of what you charge for this service, we will only pay you X amount. If you want the people we insure, you will only charge us (and them), X amount, regardless of what you charge the uninsured.

Because the patient's agreement with the insurance company is that they only pay 20% (or whatever) of the fee, the doctor can't charge the difference to the patient if they want to keep that insurance company's business. And if they lose the insurance company, they lose the patient - who will go to a doctor that still accepts that insurance company.

The truely obnoxious part about all this is that the uninsured pay the full cost - they (who are usually uninsured because of low income) will be charged more than the insurance compay will be..
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Monday 12/1/08 - 11:57:50 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Monday 12/1/08 - 11:38:09 PM Wanderer wrote:
The insurance company has a co-pay that the patient pays - usually 20%. The insurance company says to the doctor, regardless of what you charge for this service, we will only pay you X amount. If you want the people we insure, you will only charge us (and them), X amount, regardless of what you charge the uninsured. Because the patient's agreement with the insurance company is that they only pay 20% (or whatever) of the fee, the doctor can't charge the difference to the patient if they want to keep that insurance company's business.


This is what I don't get. Where does the insurance company get off telling the Dr. how much they will pay? Either they pay 80% of the total cost and the other 20% by the patient, or they pay X amount and the remainder to the patient. How is that even legal?
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 12:23:07 AM EST (GMT-5)
Free market.

The insurance company says 'take it or we leave' to the doctor.

If the doctor doesn't take it, he looses the patient, who certainly will choose a doctor who does take that insurance company.

It's legal because:
1. We're wedded to the idea of the 'free market' even when it is destructive. (Those who believe in it will say that the free market is keeping the cost of medical care lower than it might otherwise be - which I think is bullpoo, but they're true believers.)

2. The insurance companies have mega-bucks for lobbying. They can pretty much dictate the laws.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 2:51:39 AM EST (GMT-5)
Private - yes.

Public - no.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 9:48:27 AM EST (GMT-5)
if someone needs it, they should be able to get it
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 10:22:05 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Tuesday 12/2/08 - 12:23:07 AM Wanderer wrote:
It's legal because: 1. We're wedded to the idea of the 'free market' even when it is destructive. (Those who believe in it will say that the free market is keeping the cost of medical care lower than it might otherwise be - which I think is bullpoo, but they're true believers.) 2. The insurance companies have mega-bucks for lobbying. They can pretty much dictate the laws.


Would it be better if the insurance paid the full amount and passed along the increased costs to the people paying the premiums?

How would taking away the free market forces make costs lower? Now we have several insurance companies competing for a doctor- - the ones that cover the most of the doc's costs are likely to attract the most docs to their coverage network.

13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 10:26:56 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Tuesday 12/2/08 - 10:22:05 AM CowDung wrote:
Would it be better if the insurance paid the full amount and passed along the increased costs to the people paying the premiums? How would taking away the free market forces make costs lower? Now we have several insurance companies competing for a doctor- - the ones that cover the most of the doc's costs are likely to attract the most docs to their coverage network.


In reality, I think you have more Dr. competing for insurance company's patients. Which doesn't always work out well for the Dr. or the patient.

If you really wanted to assess the true value of vaccines in a free market, you would include the indirect benefit that we all get when a person is vaccinated, receives preventative medicine, and in general has access to high quality healthcare. And we would all help pay for it.
13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 11:12:31 AM EST (GMT-5)
We all do help pay for it- - it's built in to our insurance premiums.


13 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Tuesday 12/2/08 - 11:54:18 AM EST (GMT-5)
Apparently not, if doctors are thinking about not offering vaccines because they cost more than the insurance is willing to pay.
13 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Wednesday 1/14/09 - 11:46:05 AM EST (GMT-5)
Here the people getting the vaccine usually go to the pharmacy and buy it and then go to the doctor with the vaccine so they can get the vaccine.
13 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Sunday 5/24/09 - 12:14:10 AM EST (GMT-5)



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