Perpetual Water is a water laundry system owned and patented by an Australian company providing solutions in grey water purification and recycling on a domestic scale. This is an easy way to put an end to water wastage and shortage by recycling water from your shower, bath, hand basin and washing machine. Water from Perpetual Water is cleaned of organic, inorganic and biological impurities leaving you with clear, healthy water suitable for recreation, washing clothes, cleaning cars and watering your garden. 

To the water conscious, the Perpetual Water grey water recycling system can help save up to 67% of the household water daily used. Introducing the technology into a house is an effective way to meet the BASIX and 5 star standard water saving requirements in one easy step. This is the ideal way to a water restriction free life. It collects all the grey water from showers and washing machines purifying it to Class A standard water that is safe and clean to use. The treatment cycle is fully automated and has a capacity of 660 liters per day or 240,000 liters per year.

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290 hits 4.0 (1 vote) Share Favorite | Flag 14 years ago by KikiPeepers

Would you like a system that recycles grey water into water that can be used by your household (except for human consumption)?
Perpetual Water is a water laundry system owned and patented by an Australian company providing solutions in grey water purification and recycling on a domestic scale. This is an easy way to put an end to water wastage and shortage by recycling water from your shower, bath, hand basin and washing machine. Water from Perpetual Water is cleaned of organic, inorganic and biological impurities leaving you with clear, healthy water suitable for recreation, washing clothes, cleaning cars and watering your garden.

To the water conscious, the Perpetual Water grey water recycling system can help save up to 67% of the household water daily used. Introducing the technology into a house is an effective way to meet the BASIX and 5 star standard water saving requirements in one easy step. This is the ideal way to a water restriction free life. It collects all the grey water from showers and washing machines purifying it to Class A standard water that is safe and clean to use. The treatment cycle is fully automated and has a capacity of 660 liters per day or 240,000 liters per year.

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14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Sunday 10/28/07 - 7:52:54 PM EST (GMT-5)
why cant i drink it?
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Sunday 10/28/07 - 7:54:07 PM EST (GMT-5)
I guess this'd be the end of peeing in the shower
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:43:29 AM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/28/2007 7:52:55 PM Jagger_Boaz wrote:
why cant i drink it?

Because it's grey water - it won't get filtered like your city would filter water, it'll just filter it enough so you can use it to water your yard or plants, wash your car, etc.

14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:47:10 AM EST (GMT-5)
Could it be used for the same purpose the next day? Or could it fill the toilet tank?
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:47:13 AM EST (GMT-5)
It would be a waste of money for me, I'd still have to pay for either bottles of water or the filters for my water purifier so I'd have something to drink.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:54:30 AM EST (GMT-5)
"...leaving you with clear, healthy water suitable for recreation, washing clothes, cleaning cars and watering your garden."
Ah, that answers my question. Sounds pretty awesome. What's the upfront cost?
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:59:38 AM EST (GMT-5)
Is there an American equivalent?
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 10:06:17 AM EST (GMT-5)
^I'd say not yet, this isn't really a surprising development given the price of water in Australia at the moment. It's not really an environmental idea, more of a "We haven't got any bloody water!" one.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 10:25:06 AM EST (GMT-5)
Mightyrhinox is probably right, I doubt America has a version yet. Outside of California, we don't have droughts too often but Australia needs lots of water conservation. We all do, but they always seem to be in a draught. Hopefully it would catch on worldwide though!
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 10:26:20 AM EST (GMT-5)
Wait how do you spell that? I spelled it two different ways. I could be Hooked on Phonics and we'll just call it a drouwt
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 10:39:39 AM EST (GMT-5)
Drought, Draught is pronounced draft (Draught beer etc.).
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 11:47:42 AM EST (GMT-5)
Ahh gotcha. Guess I don't use that word much!
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 11:49:28 AM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/29/2007 10:06:17 AM Mightyrhinox wrote:
I'd say not yet... It's not really an environmental idea, more of a "We haven't got any bloody water!" one.

That's too bad, but it again proves the point a buddy of mine made back in 1990: the environmental movement won't take off until it's profitable.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 12:10:03 PM EST (GMT-5)
What does this really accomplish? The local municipal treatment plants already treat the wastewater. Would treating it ourselves just result in more concentrated wastewater going to the treatment plant? I would think that the lower the amount of graywater sent for treatment would make it more difficult to process the wastewater.

14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 2:10:14 PM EST (GMT-5)
The story says it can save up to 67% of the water used in the house. For people concerned about conserving water, that's a lot, and it would also save you money, too. That would probably be $100 off my monthly water bill.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 2:10:49 PM EST (GMT-5)
Frankly, CD, I'm surprised you don't see the benefit of it.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 2:13:16 PM EST (GMT-5)
Yeah, I don't see why not.

I think the initial 'ick' factor of doing stuff with your own [treated] waste water would wear off pretty quickly.

14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 3:30:23 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/29/2007 2:10:49 PM IRLIteach wrote:
Frankly, CD, I'm surprised you don't see the benefit of it.

I guess I see it as adding more concentrated loading to the influent stream of the local wastewater treatment facility, making it more difficult (and probably costlier) to treat the wastewater.

Perhaps I just live in a water rich area--I never heard of a $100/month water bill...

14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 4:14:11 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/29/2007 12:10:04 PM CowDung wrote:
What does this really accomplish? The local municipal treatment plants already treat the wastewater. Would treating it ourselves just result in more concentrated wastewater going to the treatment plant? I would think that the lower the amount of graywater sent for treatment would make it more difficult to process the wastewater.

In Sydney, you're not allowed to wash your car, and can only water your garden between certain times on a certain day(i.e. odd numbers in a street, 12-1pm on tuesday, even; 12-1 thursday) And you are fined for excess water consumption...
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 9:22:26 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/29/2007 3:30:23 PM CowDung wrote:
Perhaps I just live in a water rich area--I never heard of a $100/month water bill...

Ours is usually between $30-50 a month ... but we use high efficiency dishwasher and washing machine, I think that helps.

14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Monday 10/29/07 - 11:05:19 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/29/2007 9:22:26 PM KikiPeepers wrote:
Ours is usually between $30-50 a month ... but we use high efficiency dishwasher and washing machine, I think that helps.

We run a normal dishwasher (6 years old) and 2 of the oldest washing machines you would ever see in operation (both were made in the 1970s) and our water bill is less than that.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Tuesday 10/30/07 - 1:57:57 PM EST (GMT-5)
How is yours so cheap?! I thought mine was cheap.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Tuesday 10/30/07 - 2:06:46 PM EST (GMT-5)
I dunno--maybe it has something to do with the Great Lake that sits nearby. The water may not be all that clean, but it's cheap...
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Tuesday 10/30/07 - 2:13:37 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 10/28/2007 7:54:07 PM blicero wrote:
I guess this'd be the end of peeing in the shower

Ha ha ha.
14 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Tuesday 10/30/07 - 2:43:43 PM EST (GMT-5)
I think it's a great idea, especially in places like Australia with the droughts.

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