First Lt. Ehren Watada, a 28-year-old Hawaii native, is the first commissioned officer in the U.S. to publicly refuse deployment to Iraq. He announced last June his decision not to deploy on the grounds the war is illegal. 

Lt. Watada was based at Fort Lewis, Washington, with the Army's 3rd (Stryker) Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division. He has remained on base, thus avoiding charges of desertion. He does, however, face one count of 'missing troop movement' and four counts of 'conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman.' If convicted, he faces up to six years in prison. 

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424 hits Rate me! Share Favorite | Flag 15 years ago by KikiPeepers

Should the American government allow people to be conscientious objectors without the threat of prison time?
First Lt. Ehren Watada, a 28-year-old Hawaii native, is the first commissioned officer in the U.S. to publicly refuse deployment to Iraq. He announced last June his decision not to deploy on the grounds the war is illegal.

Lt. Watada was based at Fort Lewis, Washington, with the Army`s 3rd (Stryker) Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division. He has remained on base, thus avoiding charges of desertion. He does, however, face one count of `missing troop movement` and four counts of `conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman.` If convicted, he faces up to six years in prison.

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15 yrs ago - Wednesday 5/2/07 - 11:21:05 AM EST (GMT-5)
Yes, it should. People who are against the war shouldn't have to put their lives at risk just to fight a war that they don't agree with in the first place. They shouldn't go to prison for that. Although there's always the choice of not joining the military.

There are other jobs that people can do in the military like being stationed in a base overseas(like bases in Netherlands, Belgium etc) without risking their lives daily.

15 yrs ago - Wednesday 5/2/07 - 11:26:19 AM EST (GMT-5)
To answer the question: of course.

To answer angelyesgr:

Being a concientious objector has nothing to do with worrying about risking your life, so being stationed in non-risky military base really doesn't address the issue.

And, as far as I know being a concientious objector means you object to all wars, not just some wars.

I could be wrong on this, but I think it's all or nothing once you enter the military: either you object to all wars or you're ok with them all. You don't get to pick and choose which ones you will or will not fight in.

15 yrs ago - Wednesday 5/2/07 - 11:28:41 AM EST (GMT-5)
"I could be wrong on this, but I think it's all or nothing once you enter the military: either you object to all wars or you're ok with them all. "

if you object to all wars, why join the military? the man in the story is clearly only opposed to the war in Iraq because he thinks it's "illegal," but he's not opposed to war in general.

15 yrs ago - Wednesday 5/2/07 - 11:32:55 AM EST (GMT-5)
In other cases, military members have joined up, then realized that they objected: often it takes being there and knowing what is before you can make an informed decision for yourself.

There was a pretty long generals thread a couple of weeks ago in which wiseNsexy laid out all the legal arguements for it. Looked pretty solid to me, but I can't find the thread anymore so you'll have to ask him for details.

14 yrs ago, 11 mos ago - Friday 6/1/07 - 3:57:14 AM EST (GMT-5)
umm, if he opposes the war why is he in the military o.o?
14 yrs ago, 11 mos ago - Monday 6/11/07 - 9:18:16 AM EST (GMT-5)
On 6/1/2007 3:57:15 AM rauron wrote:
umm, if he opposes the war why is he in the military o.o?

He changed his mind when he realised the politicians hadn't exactly been honest and impartial with evidence presented to the public over reasons for the war.

14 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 9/21/07 - 5:22:14 PM EST (GMT-5)
People, yes. Soldiers, no. Once in the military, it's no longer your call.
14 yrs ago, 7 mos ago - Friday 9/28/07 - 2:42:07 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 9/21/2007 5:22:15 PM greegor wrote:
People, yes. Soldiers, no. Once in the military, it's no longer your call.

exactly. our military is completly volintary. when you decide to join, you know that you might be shipped off if a war arises. its in the contract. if you have a problem with that, and cant serve your country, then you SHOULDNT have signed up.
14 yrs ago, 5 mos ago - Thursday 12/13/07 - 8:10:13 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 9/21/2007 5:22:15 PM greegor wrote:
People, yes. Soldiers, no. Once in the military, it's no longer your call.

The military does more then just shoot people.
In fact a good chunk of the United States’ infrastructure was built by the military.




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