Court to Mull Disability Case Limits 
By GINA HOLLAND, Associated Press Writer 

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider more limits on lawsuits by the disabled, this time involving a state medical board's refusal to license a mentally ill doctor. 

Justices will decide whether agencies, like the California Medical Board, have constitutional protection from lawsuits under a federal disability law. 

Dr. Michael J. Hason sued after he was turned down for a medical license because he suffers from depression. He argued that the licensing board should have accommodated his disability by offering him a probationary license that required him to get psychotherapy or other help. 

An appeals court said Hason could sue the medical board, but the Supreme Court may stop the suit and prevent others like it..... 

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&ncid=534&e=3&cid=534&u=/ap/20021118/ap_on_go_su_co/scotus_disabilities Question Who's Online | Find Members | Private Messages
Questions
Quizzes
Articles
My Journal
Forums
Answer Questions | Question Comments | My Questions | Favorites | +Add Question
LATEST
POPULAR PRIORITY RANDOM

All | Games | Funny | Entertainment | Quizzes | Weird | Tech | People | Arts/Lit | News | Science | Sports | Places | Misc

420 hits Rate me! Share Favorite | Flag 19 years ago by KikiPeepers

Should doctors with mild mental illness like depression or anxiety have their licenses revoked?
Court to Mull Disability Case Limits

By GINA HOLLAND, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider more limits on lawsuits by the disabled, this time involving a state medical board`s refusal to license a mentally ill doctor.

Justices will decide whether agencies, like the California Medical Board, have constitutional protection from lawsuits under a federal disability law.

Dr. Michael J. Hason sued after he was turned down for a medical license because he suffers from depression. He argued that the licensing board should have accommodated his disability by offering him a probationary license that required him to get psychotherapy or other help.

An appeals court said Hason could sue the medical board, but the Supreme Court may stop the suit and prevent others like it.....

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tm...


Put This Question on Your Page (MySpace, Livejournal, Blog, etc)
[Preview] EMBED CODE:


Bottom Last Post

19 yrs ago, 5 mos ago - Tuesday 12/3/02 - 11:55:34 AM EST (GMT-5)
You know what, I really do think so. But not just mild depression, I bet there are doctors out there with bigger mental illnesses and are still practicing. That is one profession where you really have to be mentally and physically prepared to go into. People's lives may be at stake.
19 yrs ago, 5 mos ago - Thursday 12/26/02 - 11:06:25 PM EST (GMT-5)
Absolutely not! Only if their mental disorders are untreated. I think it's discriminatory to tell them that they can't practice, especially if they are under control. I have bipolar disorder and undergoing treatment and perfectly fit to become a doctor. You people are narrow-minded, you have no idea what discrimination entails and what mental illness is.
19 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 1/8/03 - 12:33:09 PM EST (GMT-5)
I can't believe how many have said yes to this so far! I don't think people realize how common depression and anxiety are ... all of you who voted yes probably just got rid of 25% of the doctors in the world :P
19 yrs ago, 3 mos ago - Wednesday 1/29/03 - 6:18:58 AM EST (GMT-5)
no because i want to be a docter wheb i grow up and i wouldnt be able to because i have a anxiety disorder....i think that mayby they should be checked up on every once in while to see how they are doing
19 yrs ago, 3 mos ago - Wednesday 1/29/03 - 6:21:30 AM EST (GMT-5)
No, but police officers with oppositional defiant disorder and/or superiority complexes should be fired...Now there's something that would make an actual difference in the world.
19 yrs ago, 3 mos ago - Wednesday 1/29/03 - 10:32:01 AM EST (GMT-5)
Ha ha ... I think ODD is a requirement if you want to be a cop
19 yrs ago, 3 mos ago - Saturday 2/1/03 - 8:03:48 AM EST (GMT-5)
"Wild"? Depression and anxiety are very common. I don't think they're wild and I also don't think they're a handicap.
15 yrs ago, 1 mos ago - Friday 4/13/07 - 4:32:54 AM EST (GMT-5)
First of all, I would object to the broad classification of depression and anxiety as "mild." Either one can run a spectrum from mild to very severe. Some people are crippled by their depression or anxiety, it's not a trivial matter by any means.

To answer the question, though, if it is interfering with their ability to diagnose and treat patients and it cannot be treated adequately then yes, they should. The same should go for physical conditions. It's not exactly "fair" to the person, it's not their fault, but it wouldn't be fair to their patients to allow someone to practice medicine who is unable to perform their job adequately.

15 yrs ago, 1 mos ago - Friday 4/13/07 - 6:29:51 AM EST (GMT-5)
I know a pyschologist that has patients with relationship problems and if you look at the things she does to a friend of ours, you would think that a psychologist that does relationship therapy would never do the things she does.
She has gone to my friend's place, threw everything on the floor, broke plates etc. She comes from a rich family and her parents have used a detective to find more about us and our friend and in general her family is crazy.

So yes, her license should be revoked because she isn't fit to help people.

15 yrs ago, 1 mos ago - Sunday 4/22/07 - 3:19:59 PM EST (GMT-5)
I don't see how depression and anxiety could get in the way of their work. I also strongly doubt there isn't a doctor out there who hasn't gone through one depressive episode because they lost a patient.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:46:28 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 4/22/2007 3:20:00 PM mynameismike wrote:
I don't see how depression and anxiety could get in the way of their work.

Really? If depression or anxiety is severe enough it can be practically all-consuming, leaving little room for one to concentrate on anything else. I would say that it could definitely get in the way of their work. I can see anxiety in particular being problematic if it was severe, as it would often make one pre-occupied with what they are worried about, which could be a huge distraction and possibly cause a doctor to overlook something or make a mistake more easily.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:49:25 PM EST (GMT-5)
As burnt said above, if their disorder is a problem to the point that it interferes with their work, they shouldn't be allowed to continue.

On 4/22/2007 3:20:00 PM mynameismike wrote:
I don't see how depression and anxiety could get in the way of their work.


So if a doctor were to have a severe anxiety attack while he was, say, operating on your heart, it wouldn't be affecting his work?
How about a doctor who's so buried in the depths of depression (depression normally *does* affect concentration) that he isn't listening to you while you're describing some dangerous symptoms you've been having?

On 4/22/2007 3:20:00 PM mynameismike wrote:
I also strongly doubt there isn't a doctor out there who hasn't gone through one depressive episode because they lost a patient.

Going through a brief depressive episode isn't exactly the same as having ongoing, severe clinical depression.

15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:50:38 PM EST (GMT-5)
And, of course, I'm sure you're aware that having a depressive episode does not mean that someone has a mental illness. Everyone has depressive episodes, not everyone suffers from clinical depression. While you might be right that all doctors have gone through depressive episodes, not all of them would be diagnosed with depression.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:51:22 PM EST (GMT-5)
On 4/30/2007 11:49:26 PM melLowStar wrote:
Going through a brief depressive episode isn't exactly the same as having ongoing, severe clinical depression.

Ah, I see mellowstar beat me to the punch on that one.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:51:38 PM EST (GMT-5)
If the mental illness is impairing their ability to function in life, they should be helped. I don't think it is fair to revoke a license. They have spent years and years and time and money on their education. If they're mentally ill, they cannot help it and mild depression and anxiety can be helped.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:52:09 PM EST (GMT-5)
Anxiety at times prevents me from performing my duties at work, which include such things as testing telephones.
I don't even want to imagine what would happen if a doctor with an anxiety disorder had an attack while operating.
15 yrs ago - Monday 4/30/07 - 11:54:25 PM EST (GMT-5)
"If they're mentally ill, they cannot help it and mild depression and anxiety can be helped."

This sentence got so messed up. Ugh. I mean, depression and anxiety can be treated and they aren't always permanent illnesses. Also, it's not he person's fault that they ended up with the illness so revoking a license that they worked so hard for seems so unfair to me.

15 yrs ago - Tuesday 5/1/07 - 12:22:41 AM EST (GMT-5)
^Shakira, it's not always that simple. I mean, I'm on medication for my anxiety and I still have anxiety attacks on occasion. They are just far less common.
It's not fair to a person who worked so hard to become a doctor, but I feel that they should only be allowed to operate if their disorder is able to be completely controlled or cured.
It's not always possible to make sure that episodes don't occur. And triggers can't always be identified before an anxiety attack.
Medication in conjunction with therapy is usually the best combination but even that isn't a guarantee.
I'm not saying all doctors with depression or aniety should have their license revoked: rather, I think that these people should only be allowed to operate on maybe a week-to-week basis depending on the reccomendation of their therapist. And when times are unduly stressful, they should not be allowed to enter an operating room for their safety and the safety of their patients.
15 yrs ago - Tuesday 5/1/07 - 1:14:32 AM EST (GMT-5)
I never said it was simple. My mother has anxiety and I have had depression before. I said it can be "helped" and "treated". I know it's not simple. Though, there are cases like me. I had severe depression all through high school, but it has gone away on its own since then. So, I know firsthand that it isn't always permanent. However, my mother has been on various medication and still has problems with her anxiety.

I only believe that they need to be helped until they are able to have the ability to function well in their life and job rather than have their license revoked. I've never said that they should be able to work WHILE their work is being impaired by whichever mental illness they have.




You need to be logged in to post a reply

New to YT? Create a Free Account ~ Have an Account? Log In

Top



10 Most Popular Questions Today
1 What does your money do?

2 If you had a genetic disease, would you reproduce?

3 Should the clock have been shifted 6 hours when it was designed, so that dawn occurs at approximately 12:00 and each hour corresponds to an hour of daylight?

4 Have you ever seen an Aurora?

5 Do you live in a home that has been owned by your family for multiple generations?

6 Should Christians do yoga?

7 Do people become more likeable once they`ve realized their faults?

8 Does your favourite movie pass the Bechdel test?

9 Is it fair that this woman got away with purposefully miscarrying her two babies?

10 Have you sent a postcard into PostSecret?

More Questions
 
Edit