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2,700 hits 1.3 (29 votes) Share Favorite | Flag 8 years ago by Electric

Have you ever intentionally voted for a weak candidate in a party`s primary, hoping they would get nominated and lose?


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8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 1:25:30 AM EST (GMT-5)
Expected,
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:47:32 AM EST (GMT-5)
What would be the point? Why bother voting if its not for who you want to win?
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:48:49 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:47:32 AM peddlefish wrote:
What would be the point? Why bother voting if its not for who you want to win?

Because you want the weaker candidate to get nominated so they will lose to your favored candidate in the election.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 3:36:04 AM EST (GMT-5)
That's a lot of effort for someone you don't want to win.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 7:06:11 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:47:32 AM peddlefish wrote:
What would be the point? Why bother voting if its not for who you want to win?

As hard as it is to believe now, John Edwards once looked like the Democratic candidate Republicans stood no chance of beating in '08. The Black guy, the woman, they felt they had a chance, but not against Edwards. Had they lived in a state where you could choose which primary to vote in, Republicans could have chosen to vote against Edwards in hopes that they'd get a match-up in the general that was more favorable for their candidate.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 7:08:56 AM EST (GMT-5)
I am an unaffiliated voter, so I can choose which primary I want to vote in in NC. I lean heavily Democratic, but in '00 I was turned off by Gore's crappy campaign and was intrigued by John McCain's candidacy, so I chose to participate in the GOP primary and voted for McCain. Had he gotten by W, I may have ended up going for Gore in the general anyway, but it would have been a better slate, imo. (I ended up voting for Jerry Brown, the Libertarian candidate.) So, "No," the only time I ever crossed (de facto) party lines was to vote for a stronger candidate.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 9:33:23 AM EST (GMT-5)
Jerry Brown didn't run for President in 2000, and I'm pretty sure that he isn't a Libertarian. Did you mean Harry Browne?


8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 3:50:06 PM EST (GMT-5)
Yep, thanks. (Obviously it was as much a protest vote against Gore than anything if I can't even remember his name.)
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:11:19 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:47:32 AM peddlefish wrote:
What would be the point? Why bother voting if its not for who you want to win?
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:48:49 AM Electric wrote:
Because you want the weaker candidate to get nominated so they will lose to your favored candidate in the election.


this is why i think open primaries are flawed.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:13:09 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:47:32 AM peddlefish wrote:
What would be the point? Why bother voting if its not for who you want to win?
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:48:49 AM Electric wrote:
Because you want the weaker candidate to get nominated so they will lose to your favored candidate in the election.
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:11:19 PM Inquizitor wrote:
this is why i think open primaries are flawed.


You can't vote in both party primaries though. If one chooses to vote for the weaker dem, they can't cast a vote for the republican they want (for example).

8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:17:32 PM EST (GMT-5)
I voted for Hillary in the last presidential primaries- - I think she would have been much better than Obama as president.

8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:29:19 PM EST (GMT-5)
if i wanted a democrat, i'd vote for her too...there are some democrats i can side with, but sadly partisan politics are the norm more than the exception.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:36:10 PM EST (GMT-5)
It wasn't so much about 'wanting a Democrat', I thought she was better than both Obama and McCain. I would have voted for her against McCain had she won the nomination.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 5:49:12 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:17:32 PM CowDung wrote:
I voted for Hillary in the last presidential primaries- - I think she would have been much better than Obama as president.

I think she was more experienced, but but how good a President might be sometimes depends on the willingness of the people to follow. I switched my choice during the primary season b/c I thought Obama would be a better leader, despite being less experienced and less qualified in certain other ways.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Wednesday 7/13/11 - 11:33:53 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 2:48:49 AM Electric wrote:
Because you want the weaker candidate to get nominated so they will lose to your favored candidate in the election.
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:11:19 PM Inquizitor wrote:
this is why i think open primaries are flawed.
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:13:09 PM CowDung wrote:
You can't vote in both party primaries though. If one chooses to vote for the weaker dem, they can't cast a vote for the republican they want (for example).


But if the candidate you prefer in your own party is strong enough to be sure to win the party's primary, you might still want to vote for a weak opponant on the opposing side.

For instance, you don't need to vote for Obama in the Democratic Primary - he's going to win that easily. So vote for the Republican least likely to win against him in the general election.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Thursday 7/14/11 - 3:06:11 AM EST (GMT-5)
You mean all of them?
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Thursday 7/14/11 - 6:36:32 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:11:19 PM Inquizitor wrote:
this is why i think open primaries are flawed.

iirc, it's the parties themselves who decide whether their primary will be open. I think there used to be a time in NC where unaffiliated voters were welcome to vote in one party's primary, but you had to be an actual member to vote in the other. (Both parties are open now.)
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Thursday 7/14/11 - 10:25:06 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Thursday 7/14/11 - 6:36:32 AM IRLIteach wrote:
iirc, it's the parties themselves who decide whether their primary will be open. I think there used to be a time in NC where unaffiliated voters were welcome to vote in one party's primary, but you had to be an actual member to vote in the other. (Both parties are open now.)


It's actually the state that decides and makes the rules about who can vote in primary elections. Some states allow voters to choose what primary to vote in, other states allow only voters registered with a party affiliation to vote in primaries.

Here in Wisconsin, voters do not register with a party affiliation. During our primary elections, we have one ballot with both Dems and Reps so we are free to vote in either party's primary.

8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Thursday 7/14/11 - 10:27:59 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 4:13:09 PM CowDung wrote:
You can't vote in both party primaries though. If one chooses to vote for the weaker dem, they can't cast a vote for the republican they want (for example).
On Wednesday 7/13/11 - 11:33:53 PM Wanderer wrote:
But if the candidate you prefer in your own party is strong enough to be sure to win the party's primary, you might still want to vote for a weak opponant on the opposing side. For instance, you don't need to vote for Obama in the Democratic Primary - he's going to win that easily. So vote for the Republican least likely to win against him in the general election.


Correct. It's also true for the case where one's preferred party has already named a nominee and the other hasn't. There's nothing to be gained by voting for the guy that has already won the nomination...
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Thursday 7/14/11 - 8:20:57 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Thursday 7/14/11 - 10:25:06 AM CowDung wrote:
It's actually the state that decides and makes the rules about who can vote in primary elections. Some states allow voters to choose what primary to vote in, other states allow only voters registered with a party affiliation to vote in primaries.

There was a point in NC where I believe unaffiliated voters could vote in the primaries of one particular party, but they were not allowed to vote in the primaries of the other party. If you want to go research the history of primaries in the state of NC for the purpose of possibly proving my recollection incorrect, go ahead, but I don't really give a f*ck.
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Friday 7/15/11 - 9:31:54 AM EST (GMT-5)
Your response seems to indicate that you really do "give a f*ck"...
8 yrs ago, 4 mos ago - Friday 7/15/11 - 10:45:29 AM EST (GMT-5)
...to you.



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