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1,809 hits 3.0 (1 vote) Share Favorite | Flag 10 years ago by gabcab

Do you think that China should adopt a variation of the Latin alphabet as a secondary writing system?
It has been attempted before, but mostly unsuccessfully; should they try again, and if so, is it worth the effort?


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10 yrs ago, 9 mos ago - Thursday 1/7/10 - 7:50:00 PM EST (GMT-5)
Can't say I care too much what they do. If they want to stick with their own writing, more power to them. It's a lot prettier anyway.
10 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 2/5/10 - 2:16:50 AM EST (GMT-5)
Why should they?

Why shouldnt we adopt chinese as a secondary writing system instead?
10 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 2/5/10 - 4:52:25 AM EST (GMT-5)
10 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 2/5/10 - 5:01:24 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Friday 2/5/10 - 2:16:50 AM im_special wrote:
Why should they? Why shouldnt we adopt chinese as a secondary writing system instead?


I think we do on signs in parts of London and stuff; if the UN and most tourists were speaking Chinese I wouldn't mind
10 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 2/5/10 - 7:54:42 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Friday 2/5/10 - 4:52:25 AM HardRocks wrote:
[image]


I doubt most Chinese people are using this everyday, though

Should it be introduced into everyday life is the question
10 yrs ago, 8 mos ago - Friday 2/5/10 - 9:38:29 AM EST (GMT-5)
Why anyone outside of China would care about this is beyond me.
10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 5:25:47 PM EST (GMT-5)
Im not gonna tell em, you tell em. Theres only 1.5 billion of em i think they sort of outnumber everybody else unless you want to start a nuclear war.
10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 5:52:12 PM EST (GMT-5)
What do they do in Hong Kong? Don't they use both English letters and Chinese characters on their signs?

10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 7:41:28 PM EST (GMT-5)
I could see it simplifying computer input, but they get along fine as is. I see no advantage to it, so no.
10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 9:04:07 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Thursday 4/1/10 - 5:52:12 PM CowDung wrote:
What do they do in Hong Kong? Don't they use both English letters and Chinese characters on their signs?

Hong Kong is the exception to the rule. In addition to heavy use of pinyin, they also tend toward the traditional rather than simplified characters.

I do find the seeming lack of a phonetic writing system weird, though. At least with, say, Japanese, there is always hiragana to mark kanji characters phonetically (as furigana). As far as I know, there's not an equivalent in Chinese except pinyin.
10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 9:25:08 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Friday 2/5/10 - 4:52:25 AM HardRocks wrote:
[image]
On Friday 2/5/10 - 7:54:42 AM gabcab wrote:
I doubt most Chinese people are using this everyday, though Should it be introduced into everyday life is the question

They don't. Because they use Chinese characters. It works fine. Why fix it?
10 yrs ago, 6 mos ago - Thursday 4/1/10 - 10:08:24 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Thursday 4/1/10 - 5:52:12 PM CowDung wrote:
What do they do in Hong Kong? Don't they use both English letters and Chinese characters on their signs?
On Thursday 4/1/10 - 9:04:07 PM Malletman wrote:
Hong Kong is the exception to the rule. In addition to heavy use of pinyin, they also tend toward the traditional rather than simplified characters. I do find the seeming lack of a phonetic writing system weird, though. At least with, say, Japanese, there is always hiragana to mark kanji characters phonetically (as furigana). As far as I know, there's not an equivalent in Chinese except pinyin.


Do the Chinese characters have different phonetic 'readings'?

In Japanese, the same character usually has at least 2 phonetic 'readings'. It might make more sense to have the furigana so people know the correct reading for the character.



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