Not breaking news but after watching the wind blow a shopping cart into a parked car and cause a dent, I was curious to find out why people don’t return... Who's Online | Find Members | Private Messages
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Reasons why people don’t return shopping carts

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16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:18:29 AM EST (GMT-5)
Not breaking news but after watching the wind blow a shopping cart into a parked car and cause a dent, I was curious to find out why people don’t return shopping carts and found this article. Interesting reasons and not surprising:

Pulling up to a parking spot and finding a shopping cart there can be pretty frustrating. Why do people ignore the receptacle? It seems like a basic courtesy to others: you get a cart at the supermarket, you use it to get your groceries and bring them to your vehicle, and then you return it for others to use. And yet, it's not uncommon for many people to ignore the cart receptacle entirely and leave their carts next to their cars or parked haphazardly on medians. During peak hours, it can mean bedlam. Where does this disregard come from?

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:19:26 AM EST (GMT-5)
People may leave their carts stranded for some of the following reasons:

The receptacle is too far from where they've parked their car.

They have a child whom they do not want to leave unattended.

The weather is bad.

They have a disability that prohibitive to easy movement.
The perception that it's someone else's job to collect the carts.

They're leaving the carts for someone else to easily pick up and use.

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:19:55 AM EST (GMT-5)
Social norms fall into two general categories. There are injunctive norms, which drive our responses based on our perception of how others will interpret our actions. This means that we're inclined to act in certain ways if we think people will think well or think poorly of us. And there are descriptive norms, where our responses are driven by contextual clues. This means we're apt to mimic behaviors of others—so what we see or hear or smell suggests the appropriate/accepted response or behavior that we should display.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.co...
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:47:42 AM EST (GMT-5)
Tl;dr they're drating lazy.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:50:05 AM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 9:47:42 AM CuckingFunt wrote:
Tl;dr they're drating lazy.


Yep.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 11:30:51 AM EST (GMT-5)
While I agree that it usually boils down to laziness, there is also the issue of drivers who don't watch for pedestrians.

pedestrian auto accidents
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:12:55 PM EST (GMT-5)
“ The receptacle is too far from where they've parked their car.”. This and “The guy will get them”. ( I had a job where I was that guy)
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:16:00 PM EST (GMT-5)
I remember a lady giving me a look when I left the cart off to the side instead of rolling it all the way back to the store. So she’s getting mad at me for something that people commonly do. It’s not really my job to keep the shopping carts organized. They have a guy to do that.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:25:14 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 11:30:51 AM postallbear wrote:
While I agree that it usually boils down to laziness, there is also the issue of drivers who don't watch for pedestrians. [link]


Are you claiming this as a reason for not returning shopping carts, or what? Are people too afraid of being hit by a car to return their cart?

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:46:38 PM EST (GMT-5)
Oh sociology why do I dislike you so.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:57:57 PM EST (GMT-5)
I could maybe understand if someone had a small child or if it was pouring down rain, but it is lazy and very inconsiderate for everyone else. And people steal the carts.

It does seem like social norms do have an impact. If there are carts all over, then people may be less likely to put the cart back. Kind of like the "broken Window" theory.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:58:34 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:56:42 PM skirtgirl2 wrote:
I could maybe understand if someone had a small child ...


I don't understand the small child thing- - they should be able to put the cart back, take the child out of the cart, and then return to the car with child.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:58:56 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 11:30:51 AM postallbear wrote:
While I agree that it usually boils down to laziness, there is also the issue of drivers who don't watch for pedestrians. [link]
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:25:14 PM CowDung wrote:
Are you claiming this as a reason for not returning shopping carts, or what? Are people too afraid of being hit by a car to return their cart?

People drive way too fast (or back out too fast) in parking lots.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:59:04 PM EST (GMT-5)
...child is never 'unattended'.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:00:54 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 11:30:51 AM postallbear wrote:
While I agree that it usually boils down to laziness, there is also the issue of drivers who don't watch for pedestrians. [link]
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:25:14 PM CowDung wrote:
Are you claiming this as a reason for not returning shopping carts, or what? Are people too afraid of being hit by a car to return their cart?
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:58:56 PM Abzurd wrote:
People drive way too fast (or back out too fast) in parking lots.


True, but I think if they are that afraid of being hit, people would be reluctant to drive into the lot to begin with and get in a wreck.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:01:02 PM EST (GMT-5)
The mom probably doesn't want to leave the child in the car alone, even just taking the cart back.

Probably someone would call the police about a child left alone in the car
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:01:49 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:01:02 PM skirtgirl2 wrote:
The mom probably doesn't want to leave the child in the car alone, even just taking the cart back. Probably someone would call the police about a child left alone in the car


They aren't in the car alone- - the child is in the cart the whole time, and carried back to the car after the cart is returned.

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:02:08 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:58:34 PM CowDung wrote:
I don't understand the small child thing- - they should be able to put the cart back, take the child out of the cart, and then return to the car with child.

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:02:26 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:01:02 PM skirtgirl2 wrote:
The mom probably doesn't want to leave the child in the car alone, even just taking the cart back. Probably someone would call the police about a child left alone in the car

How huge are the parking lots in the US?!?
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:04:33 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:01:02 PM skirtgirl2 wrote:
The mom probably doesn't want to leave the child in the car alone, even just taking the cart back. Probably someone would call the police about a child left alone in the car
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:02:26 PM Abzurd wrote:
How huge are the parking lots in the US?!?


That's another question I had- - if one is so far away from the car that someone would call the police to report an unattended child during the time it takes to return the cart, then the cart return is way too far away to be practical...

16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:07:25 PM EST (GMT-5)
Here are some of the responses:

I always bring them back, but when I had 3 small kids it was challenging: walking with kids over a busy parking lot is scary, but you also do not want to leave the kids alone in the car. So I understand it when a parent leaves a cart, preferably in a safe spot, in the lot, and not bring it back to the store.

I returned the carts until I had kids. Kids really do change everything. Lol! The truth is that by the time I'm done shopping with my kids, I'm so frazzled and want to be out of there so badly, people are lucky I don't run them over. Forget about the cart.

cont...
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:08:10 PM EST (GMT-5)
Here in the South, leaving your kids under 12 in the car in the heat (normally Mar-Nov) is illegal. If there's no spots near a corral, I park the cart near something stationary (like a tree) and don't worry about it. CPS went after a woman for leaving her kid to pay for gas. I'm not dealing with that.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.co...
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:13:43 PM EST (GMT-5)
What bugs me are the people that use the handicapped spaces that do not seem handicapped and of course do not put the carts back.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:13:55 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 11:30:51 AM postallbear wrote:
While I agree that it usually boils down to laziness, there is also the issue of drivers who don't watch for pedestrians. [link]
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 12:25:14 PM CowDung wrote:
Are you claiming this as a reason for not returning shopping carts, or what? Are people too afraid of being hit by a car to return their cart?

No. Hopefully that isn't an issue for able bodied pedestrians. Just that it's another issue relating to parking lots and safety there.
16 days ago - Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:20:05 PM EST (GMT-5)
On Wednesday 1/8/20 - 1:13:43 PM skirtgirl2 wrote:
What bugs me are the people that use the handicapped spaces that do not seem handicapped and of course do not put the carts back.


Handicaps/disabilities aren't always visually detectable to the casual observer. One shouldn't judge those parking in a handicapped space if they have the proper handicapped parking authorizations.



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